Monday, April 24, 2017

Learning from students: Free verse

Here's another example from my adult students sharing poetry with young people in my "learning from my students' students" series. 

Here, Mary got the students involved in PowerPack 9 of Here We Go and they had fun with it.

First, she tried the PowerPlay activity with students. They drew pictures and made lists of their favorite foods.


Then she created original digital poem postcards for each of the three poems in the PowerPack. Here is a digital postcard for the anchor poem by Joseph Bruchac.

Then, she shared the response poem a student wrote in relation to the mentor text poem.

Finally, Mary also recommended an additional resource book of food-related poetry and a helpful website that students might enjoy in her final slide:






Sunday, April 23, 2017

Learning from students: Tercets

Here's another example from my adult students sharing poetry with young people in my "learning from my students' students" series. 

Here, Jennifer got the students involved in PowerPack 8 of Here We Go with a focus on tercets.

First, she tried the PowerPlay activity with students. They circled every third word in a prose passage and then made a three-line poem using some of those circled words.


Then she created original digital poem postcards for each of the three poems in the PowerPack. Here are two digital postcards for the two response poems by Janet Wong:



Then, she shared the response poem the student wrote in relation to the mentor text poem-- using tercets. Here are two examples.












Saturday, April 22, 2017

Learning from Students: Narrative poems

Here's another example from my adult students sharing poetry with young people in my "learning from my students' students" series. 

Here, Jennifer responded to PowerPack 7 of Here We Go herself!

First, she tried the PowerPlay activity.


Then she created original digital poem postcards for each of the three poems in the PowerPack. Here are two digital postcards for two response poems by Janet Wong:




Finally, Jennifer also recommended additional resource books that students might enjoy in her final slide and included a variety of types of books that woven together verse, prose, and a look at Ramadan more closely.



Friday, April 21, 2017

Building Blocks of Language Learning

I'm pausing for a moment in my month-long showcase of my students' creative work to look at another session I'm presenting at the Texas Library Association conference. Here are the details:

Building Blocks of Language Learning
What role does the librarian play in building readers? This session focuses on using a rich poetry toolbox that supports ELAR and ELL TEKS to acquire language skills. Learn to teach educators to celebrate language with humor and meaning. 

We're looking at how sharing a poem can also showcase the requisite skills that young children are acquiring as they develop their language knowledge-- and in a way that is engaging and appealing. We'll be sharing poems for several key language learning areas as models. Here are just a few!

SKILL FOCUS: How English is written and printed. The line breaks of poetry provide one example.

SKILL FOCUS: Phonological awareness (phonics). How sound works in poetry, particularly rhyme and alliteration.


SKILL FOCUS: Decoding words using many sources of input. Here, we focus on synonyms, antonyms, and homonyms.
SKILL FOCUS: Understanding new vocabulary. Poetry is FULL of vivid words and an ideal tool for developing and expanding children's vocabularies. 



SKILL FOCUS: The use of conventions in writing, particularly capitalization and punctuation. Poets make creative and frequent use of these tools!



SKILL FOCUS: Spelling and how words should be spelled. Poets play with words, spelling, and coining of new words in creative ways. 




We even offer a complete matrix of skills coverage in THE POETRY FRIDAY ANTHOLOGY FOR CELEBRATIONS that shows how each of these skills is present in poems in the book. 

And finally, there are so many wonderful works of poetry that feature these same elements (line breaks, opposites, wordplay, rhyme, alliteration, etc.). Check them out! 



















Thursday, April 20, 2017

Learning from students: Opposites

Here's another example from my adult students sharing poetry with young people in my "learning from my students' students" series. 

Here, Lacey got the students involved in PowerPack 6 of Here We Go and they had fun exploring with it.

First, she tried the PowerPlay activity with students focused on "Not this, but that."


Then she created original digital poem postcards for each of the three poems in the PowerPack. Here is a digital postcard for a response poem by Janet Wong:

Then, she shared the response poems that two students wrote in relation to the mentor text poem. These are poems with opposites.


Finally, Lacey also recommended additional resource books that feature opposites that students might enjoy in her final slide:


Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Learning from students: Cinquains

Here's another example from my adult students sharing poetry with young people in my "learning from my students' students" series. 

Here, Judith got the students involved in PowerPack 5 of Here We Go and they had fun with it.

First, she tried the PowerPlay activity with students.

"Trace the outline of your left hand. Then fill in the area with doodles and drawings that reflect things about you and your wishes for the future."















"Then trace the outline of your right hand and fill in the area with words that reflect things about you and your wishes for the future." [On each finger: Dogs, snakes, cats, lizards, ferrets. On the palm: baker, family, basketball]



Then she created original digital poem postcards for each of the three poems in the PowerPack. Here is a digital postcard for the anchor poem by Margaret Simon.



Then, she shared the response poem the student wrote in relation to the mentor text poem.



Best Friends

My friends
are funny and
make me laugh out loud. They
give me feelings of love and joy
always.

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Learning from students: Rhyme

Here's another example from my adult students sharing poetry with young people in my "learning from my students' students" series. 

Here, Veronica and Natasha both got the students involved in PowerPack 4 of Here We Go and they had fun with it.

First, they both tried the PowerPlay activity with students. Here is Natasha's student's responses:


And here is Veronica's student's responses:



Then they both created original digital poem postcards for each of the three poems in the PowerPack. Here's Natasha's postcard for the anchor poem by Kate Coombs:




Here is a digital postcard for a response poem by Janet Wong created by Veronica:

Then, Natasha shared the response poem a student wrote in relation to the mentor text poem:


Finally, Veronica also recommended additional resource books that students might enjoy in her final slide:






Monday, April 17, 2017

Learning from students: Question poems

Here's another example from my adult students sharing poetry with young people in my "learning from my students' students" series. 

Now we're switching gears and looking at how my students and their students interacted with Here We Go: A Poetry Friday Power Book using each PowerPack to see how young writers responded.

Here, Christine got the students involved in PowerPack 3 of Here We Go beginning with this PowerPlay activity that asks students to circle the questions that interest them, cross out those that do NOT, and generate a big question that concerns them.



Next, she created original digital poem postcards for each of the three poems in PowerPack 6. Here is her slide for the "anchor" poem by Carole Boston Weatherford:

Then, she shared the response poem the student wrote in relation to the mentor text poem-- a question poem.  










Sunday, April 16, 2017

Learning from students: Similes

Here's another example from my adult students sharing poetry with young people in my "learning from my students' students" series. 

Now we're switching gears and looking at how my students and their students interacted with Here We Go: A Poetry Friday Power Book using each PowerPack to see how young writers responded.

Here, Wendy got the students involved in PowerPack 2 of Here We Go and I'll share a few nuggets from her work.

First, here is the PowerPlay activity and the Power2You poem writing activity for one student. The focus is learning about similes.

Then Wendy created original digital poem postcards for each of the three poems in PowerPack 2 using photographs that she took herself. Here's one example:







Finally, Wendy also recommended additional titles of poetry featuring Latino/Latina poets that students might enjoy in her resources slide:


Saturday, April 15, 2017

Learning from students: Repetition

Here comes another example from my adult students sharing poetry with young people in my "learning from my students' students" series. 

Now we're switching gears and looking at how my students and their students interacted with Here We Go: A Poetry Friday Power Book using each PowerPack to see how young writers responded.

Adrianna created original digital poem postcards for each of the three poems in PowerPack 1. I'll share one example that she created for a response poem by Janet Wong:


Then, she shared the response poem the student wrote in relation to the mentor text poem featuring repetition.


Finally, Adrianna also recommended resource books about writing poetry in her resources slide: